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UE88 - Ottoman Translation Lab


Lieu et planning


Planning en cours de validation.


Description


Dernière modification : 15 mai 2024 07:24

Type d'UE
Séminaires DE/MC
Disciplines
Anthropologie historique, Histoire, Linguistique, sémantique
Page web
-
Langues
allemand anglais français
Mots-clés
Administration Analyse de discours Anthropologie et linguistique Archives Écriture Histoire Historiographie Humanités numériques Informatique et sciences sociales Orientalisme Paléographie Philologie Sémantique Textes
Aires culturelles
Arabe (monde) Juives (études) Méditerranéens (mondes) Musulmans (mondes) Turc (domaine)
Intervenant·e·s
  • Marc Aymes [référent·e]   directeur d'études, EHESS - directeur de recherche, CNRS / Centre d'études turques, ottomanes, balkaniques et centrasiatiques (CETOBaC)
  • E. Natalie Rothman   professeure, University of Toronto
  • Henning Sievert   professeur, Universität Heidelberg

Also core team member:
Renaud Soler, associate professor at the University of Strasbourg (Groupe d'études orientales, slaves et néo-helléniques)

#

Translingual practices were an essential feature of Ottoman social worlds. Like most imperial formations, the Ottoman political and social system consisted of multiple linguistic jurisdictions. The Ottoman language commanded by the palatial elite, was a mixture of three languages, Arabic, Persian and Turkish. But other subjects of the empire communicated not only in different registers of the above, but in many other languages too, including Albanian, Aramaic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Greek, Hungarian, Judeo-Spanish, Kurdish-Kurmandji, Persian, Polish, Romanian, Serbo-Croatian, Zazaki... And for some of the more extroverted social segments, French, Italian, or lingua franca were de rigueur. Thus translation is a critical facet of the study of the Ottoman Empire.

This seminar focuses on “translation” understood broadly to encompass not only written works (the mainstay of Ottoman Translation Studies to date) but also other linguistic practices, often more anonymous and less authorized, in varied social domains, including administration and commerce. It posits that translingual practices—the circulations of linguistic elements and meanings across languages, sociocultural registers, and genres—were not simply endemic to Ottoman society, but, in fact, key to Ottoman government practices in its longue durée and across its expansive spatial footprint.

Our aim is to approach translation as a sociological as well as a philological issue – i.e., to combine our philologically assembled evidence with a socio-historical framework of analysis of imperial practices of government. We will attempt to take stock of the multiple philologies (analogue or digital) that the study of these practices therefore requires.

Format-wise, although it does not shy away from lectures, our “lab” gives priority to hands-on experiments and workshop discussions on primary sources and/or scholarly literature. All participants involved (including doctoral students, computer scientists or developers) are welcome to present their work so as to better grasp the diversity of scholarship and tools at hand in the field.

Starting in 2024, this seminar is part of an “International Research Network” (IRN) funded by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France). Under the codename “Translating Ottomans: Translingual Practices Meet Digital Humanities” it brings together partners such as the Institut für Orientalistik at the University of Vienna (Austria), the Department and Historical and Cultural Studies at the University of Toronto (Canada), the Centre d’Études Turques, Ottomanes, Balkaniques et Centrasiatiques along with the Huma-Num DISTAM Consortium (France), the Seminar für Sprachen und Kulturen des Vorderen Orients – Islamwissenschaft at the Heidelberg University (Germany), and the Dipartimento di Studi sull’Asia e sull’Africa Mediterranea at the Università Ca’ Foscari (Italy).

Full programme: TBA


Master


  • Séminaires de recherche – Arts, littératures et langages-Pratiques, discours et usages – M1/S1-S2-M2/S3-S4
    Suivi et validation – annuel mensuelle = 3 ECTS
    MCC – exposé oral
  • Séminaires de recherche – Savoirs en sociétés-Histoire des sciences, des techniques et des savoirs – M1/S1-S2-M2/S3-S4
    Suivi et validation – annuel mensuelle = 3 ECTS
    MCC – exposé oral
  • Séminaires de recherche – Sciences des religions et société-L'Islam en société : trajectoires historiques et contemporaines – M1/S1-S2-M2/S3-S4
    Suivi et validation – annuel mensuelle = 3 ECTS
    MCC – exposé oral

Renseignements


Contacts additionnels
-
Informations pratiques

Meeting link provided on request.

Direction de travaux des étudiants

Please contact organizing team.

Réception des candidats

By appointment.

Pré-requis

Language skills in the field are welcome but not required.

Dernière modification : 15 mai 2024 07:24

Type d'UE
Séminaires DE/MC
Disciplines
Anthropologie historique, Histoire, Linguistique, sémantique
Page web
-
Langues
allemand anglais français
Mots-clés
Administration Analyse de discours Anthropologie et linguistique Archives Écriture Histoire Historiographie Humanités numériques Informatique et sciences sociales Orientalisme Paléographie Philologie Sémantique Textes
Aires culturelles
Arabe (monde) Juives (études) Méditerranéens (mondes) Musulmans (mondes) Turc (domaine)
Intervenant·e·s
  • Marc Aymes [référent·e]   directeur d'études, EHESS - directeur de recherche, CNRS / Centre d'études turques, ottomanes, balkaniques et centrasiatiques (CETOBaC)
  • E. Natalie Rothman   professeure, University of Toronto
  • Henning Sievert   professeur, Universität Heidelberg

Also core team member:
Renaud Soler, associate professor at the University of Strasbourg (Groupe d'études orientales, slaves et néo-helléniques)

#

Translingual practices were an essential feature of Ottoman social worlds. Like most imperial formations, the Ottoman political and social system consisted of multiple linguistic jurisdictions. The Ottoman language commanded by the palatial elite, was a mixture of three languages, Arabic, Persian and Turkish. But other subjects of the empire communicated not only in different registers of the above, but in many other languages too, including Albanian, Aramaic, Armenian, Bulgarian, Greek, Hungarian, Judeo-Spanish, Kurdish-Kurmandji, Persian, Polish, Romanian, Serbo-Croatian, Zazaki... And for some of the more extroverted social segments, French, Italian, or lingua franca were de rigueur. Thus translation is a critical facet of the study of the Ottoman Empire.

This seminar focuses on “translation” understood broadly to encompass not only written works (the mainstay of Ottoman Translation Studies to date) but also other linguistic practices, often more anonymous and less authorized, in varied social domains, including administration and commerce. It posits that translingual practices—the circulations of linguistic elements and meanings across languages, sociocultural registers, and genres—were not simply endemic to Ottoman society, but, in fact, key to Ottoman government practices in its longue durée and across its expansive spatial footprint.

Our aim is to approach translation as a sociological as well as a philological issue – i.e., to combine our philologically assembled evidence with a socio-historical framework of analysis of imperial practices of government. We will attempt to take stock of the multiple philologies (analogue or digital) that the study of these practices therefore requires.

Format-wise, although it does not shy away from lectures, our “lab” gives priority to hands-on experiments and workshop discussions on primary sources and/or scholarly literature. All participants involved (including doctoral students, computer scientists or developers) are welcome to present their work so as to better grasp the diversity of scholarship and tools at hand in the field.

Starting in 2024, this seminar is part of an “International Research Network” (IRN) funded by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France). Under the codename “Translating Ottomans: Translingual Practices Meet Digital Humanities” it brings together partners such as the Institut für Orientalistik at the University of Vienna (Austria), the Department and Historical and Cultural Studies at the University of Toronto (Canada), the Centre d’Études Turques, Ottomanes, Balkaniques et Centrasiatiques along with the Huma-Num DISTAM Consortium (France), the Seminar für Sprachen und Kulturen des Vorderen Orients – Islamwissenschaft at the Heidelberg University (Germany), and the Dipartimento di Studi sull’Asia e sull’Africa Mediterranea at the Università Ca’ Foscari (Italy).

Full programme: TBA

  • Séminaires de recherche – Arts, littératures et langages-Pratiques, discours et usages – M1/S1-S2-M2/S3-S4
    Suivi et validation – annuel mensuelle = 3 ECTS
    MCC – exposé oral
  • Séminaires de recherche – Savoirs en sociétés-Histoire des sciences, des techniques et des savoirs – M1/S1-S2-M2/S3-S4
    Suivi et validation – annuel mensuelle = 3 ECTS
    MCC – exposé oral
  • Séminaires de recherche – Sciences des religions et société-L'Islam en société : trajectoires historiques et contemporaines – M1/S1-S2-M2/S3-S4
    Suivi et validation – annuel mensuelle = 3 ECTS
    MCC – exposé oral
Contacts additionnels
-
Informations pratiques

Meeting link provided on request.

Direction de travaux des étudiants

Please contact organizing team.

Réception des candidats

By appointment.

Pré-requis

Language skills in the field are welcome but not required.

Planning en cours de validation.