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UE242 - LING 203 Language Acquisition & Processing


Lieu et planning


  • Institut Jean-Nicod
    Salle Ribot
    29 rue d'Ulm 75005 Paris
    2nd semestre / hebdomadaire, lundi 14:00-17:00
    du 30 janvier 2023 au 15 mai 2023
    Nombre de séances : 12


Description


Dernière modification : 28 juin 2022 10:07

Type d'UE
Enseignements fondamentaux de master
Disciplines
Linguistique, sémantique, Psychologie et sciences cognitives
Page web
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fC9ZHRjMqZZCoAzvA_7BhNoLmdCUpj7E6lU94AOQwz8/edit 
Langues
anglais
L’enseignement est uniquement dispensé dans cette langue.
Mots-clés
Apprentissage Développement Linguistique Psychologie
Aires culturelles
Amérique du Nord Europe France
Intervenant·e·s

1a. Course Description (English)

What are the features of the human brain allowing for the existence and re-creation of language? How does the environment contribute to its development? Once language networks have stabilized, how do they shape their perception and production of a variety of stimuli? We draw insights from current and classical research in many disciplines (e.g., linguistic theory & laboratory linguistics, experimental & developmental psychology, neuropsychology, neuroimaging, computer modeling) to shed light on a few key psycholinguistic issues ranging from phonology to semantics. 

1b. Course Description (French)

Quelles sont les caractéristiques du cerveau humain permettant l'existence et la re-création du langage? Comment l'environnement contribue-t-il à son développement? Une fois les réseaux linguistiques stabilisés, comment façonnent-ils leur perception et leur production d'une variété de stimuli? Nous nous inspirons des recherches classiques et actuelles dans de nombreuses disciplines (par exemple, théorie linguistique et linguistique expérimentale, psychologie expérimentale et développementale, neuropsychologie, neuroimagerie, modélisation informatique) pour éclairer quelques problèmes clés en psycholinguistique qui vont de la phonologie à la sémantique.

2. Learning outcomes

This course is conceived to help students:

  • Learn some basic vocabulary and concepts necessary to describe human language (e.g., phonology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics)

  • Understand the consequences of variation in those definitions

  • Read and critically evaluate scientific literature on language acquisition and processing

  • Reflect on the role of experience for the emergence of language skills in the individual, and of language features in a given language system (e.g., English, French, Nicaraguan Sign Language, etc.)

3a. Pedagogy, class organization and homework

The course will involve classroom activities, online forum discussions, and readings. There will be two hours of fixed meetings per week (“classes”). Each class will contain a mixture of lectures with in-class activities, partially based on that week’s forum discussions, which on their stead depend on that week’s readings. Please note that we have 3 hours booked together on Mondays. We strongly encourage students to use the third hour to work on their homework.

Classes will take place in the second semester of 2022-2023 (Between January and May).

Course contents 

Class 1 : Alex de Carvalho (Université de Paris) : Introduction: course structure; main features of language; main theories about language development; sub-fields
No readings

Class 2 : Valentin Thouzeau  (Ecole normale supérieure) — Language evolution and the evolution of language
Comparison with other species, evolution of humans and why and when language appeared, pidgin and creole, emergent sign languages, language change, experimental studies of language evolution
Readings: Kirby (2001), Christiansen, Chater, & Reali (2009)

Class 3 : Sharon PEPERKAMP (Ecole normale supérieure) - Language-specific speech perception
Readings: Pallier, Colomé, & Sebastián-Gallés (2001); Skoruppa et al., (2009)

Class 4 : Maria Giavazzi  (Ecole normale supérieure) -  Using linguistic theory to understand language impairment: the example of phonological deficits
Readings: Buchwald (2014), Buchwald, et al., (2007).

Class 5 : Maureen de Seyssel (Ecole normale Supérieure) — Word Learning: linguistic, perceptual & memory constraints on word learning across development
Readings: Brent (2001), Wittgenstein (2010)

Class 6 M: aureen de Seyssel  (Ecole normale supérieure) — March 14th

Understanding and producing words (adults): Classic models and bilingualism.
Readings: Costa et al. (2000), Rugg (1990)

Class 7 : Alex de Carvalho (Université de Paris) — Acquisition of syntax
Readings: de Carvalho et al., (2019), Gutman et al., (2015)

Class 8 : Maureen de Seyssel  (Ecole normale supérieure) — Second language acquisition
Reading: Díaz et al. (2016), Sanders et al. (2002)

Class 9 : Alejandrina CRISTIA (Ecole normale supérieure) —  Interactions across linguistic levels and beyond; bottom-up, top-down, and mixed models of language.
Readings: Heinz, J., & Idsardi, W. (2011); Ramus, F., et al., (2013). 

Class 10 : Alex de Carvalho (Université de Paris) - The relationship between oral language acquisition and reading readiness and academic success
Readings: Hassinger-Das et al., (2017); Golinkoff et al., (2019).

Class 11 Sho Tsuji & Alejandrina Cristia (Ecole normale supérieure) — Language in a social context: Conversation analysis, linguistic and cultural sampling biases.
Readings: Tsuji, Cristia & Dupoux (2021)

Class 12 Irene Altarelli (Université de Paris) — Reading and writing - in the brain, different writing systems and their effect on cognitive and linguistic processing and development
Readings: Dehaene et al., (2015)


Master


  • Séminaires de tronc commun – Sciences cognitives – M1/S2-M2/S4
    Suivi et validation – semestriel hebdomadaire = 6 ECTS
    MCC – contrôle continu, fiche de lecture

Renseignements


Contacts additionnels
cogmaster@psl.eu
Informations pratiques

Classes will take place in person @ENS (29, rue d'Ulm) Salle T. Ribot

Responsable UE: Alex de Carvalho

E-mail: alex.de-carvalho@u-paris.fr

Office: 6th floor at the Laboratoire de Psychologie du Développement et de l'Éducation de l’Enfant - LaPsyDÉ, La Sorbonne - Université de Paris/CNRS

46 rue des Saint-Jacques, 75005 Paris

 

TA: Maureen de Seyssel

E-mail: maureen.deseyssel@gmail.com

Office: Centre des Sciences des Données (CSD), 45 rue d’Ulm, 75005 Paris 

Direction de travaux des étudiants

Assessments - Course Requirements and Grading

You will be evaluated in three ways.

  1. Online Forum 

a1) Participation (35% of the final grade). Each week, you should post one or more helpful and/or thought-generating comment, question, or answer bearing on the reading for that week on the online forum corresponding to that week on our Moodle webpage (section “Class Participation - Readings Forum”). Your participation can be a clarification question/answer (if there is something you did not understand, or you are answering someone who asked a clarification question); or it can bear on one of the areas that will be used to evaluate your article commentary (see item B below: research question, lit review, key term, methodology, claim, conclusions). Please use tags to indicate which it is. Your text should be maximally 250 words long - any extra words will not be read. It should be submitted by 23:59 on the Friday before the class. Grading only takes into account the first comment posted by you, but you are welcome to make more than one comment. There is a maximum of 2 points per class awarded (0=no participation or off-topic ; 1=satisfactory participation ; 2= good comment) for all classes except the very first one, and the one for which you are moderator (see next item).

a2) Moderation (10% of the final grade). For one class out of the 11 that have a forum, you will be in charge of systematizing the forum participation. Read comments and identify salient themes and/or questions that should be brought up in class, then post this as the final intervention in the corresponding forum section (“Moderation Comments” on Moodle). You must do this between Saturday at 00:00 and Sunday 23:59, so that the instructor has time to read your summary on Monday morning. When you are the moderator, you do not need to post a regular comment. If you are two moderators on the same week, post only one shared comment. The schedule of moderations for the entire semester will be fixed at the beginning of the semester (week of Feb 1st). It is now available here (link also accessible from Moodle).

B) Article commentary (50% of the grade). Imagine that you are a referee engaged in a peer-reviewed process for a generalist scientific journal. As a reviewer, your task is to evaluate an article following the 8 guiding criteria below. All criteria should be mentioned in your commentary. Each should be addressed by stating to what extent the manuscript meets it, and if not, what modifications or additions would be desirable. The text should be maximally 2000 words long (excluding bibliography, if any is cited), written in English or French. It is mandatory to write an approximate word count on the first page, and include a bibliography (using APA6 standards) on a separate page. 

You and the instructors will select one article (from this list) based on your expertise and interests.

Guidelines for article commentary:

  1. Research question: Has a research question been posed explicitly? (Yes or no.) If so, what is it according to the authors? If not, what do you think the research question should be, given the contents of the paper? Please bear in mind that a question is not the same as a theory or a hypothesis.

  2. Lit review: Is the literature review representative of diverse theoretical approaches to the research question? (Yes or no.) If yes, how? If not, what is it missing? 

  3. Key term (paper): Provide at least one example of a key concept or theoretical approach that has been defined and one that has not been defined. If you cannot find an example because they have all been defined or not defined, argument this clearly.

  4. Key term (class): Think back to the key linguistic and/or cognitive terms discussed in class; which one would be most relevant to this paper? Have the authors defined it? If not, what is the definition underlying their work? In either case, give a rationale of how a different definition would change their approach. 

  5. Methodology: Describe the methodology used. In what ways is this methodology, in principle, an appropriate or inappropriate methodology to answer the main research question?

  6. Claim: Give one example of a claim made by the authors. A claim is a statement for which there is no objective basis, and can be thus as opposed to a conclusion, which is defined as a statement  that is directly supported by the data/arguments. Do the authors present that claim as such (or do they confuse claims and conclusions)? 

  7. Conclusions: Bearing in mind the research question stated in #1, summarize briefly the conclusions drawn by the authors. In what ways do the data and/or the arguments conceptually support or not these conclusions? 

  8. Other comments: Draw on your own strengths to add something special to your review! Some examples are:

a) Commenting on the soundness of the experiments, statistics, and other analyses (including conceptual arguments).

b) OR: Providing a convincing argument whereby changing a key parameter of the methodology could lead to results opposite to those found.

c) OR: Name something missing from the literature review and explain how adding this piece of information would have affected the paper.

d) OR: anything else!

Choose one comment and develop it. In the case of multiple comments, only the first one will be graded.

C) In class participation (5% of the grade). Your in-class participation helps us evaluate your overall engagement with the course. There are many ways to participate even when the class is virtual, either by directly asking questions or using the online chat/forum. Your participation can be in English or in French. There is a maximum of 1 point per class awarded (0=no participation ; 1= participated).

3c. Textbook and readings

We will read primary scientific literature. See bibliography at the end, and course schedule below. It is mandatory to read all of the week's readings. The readings are all available on Moodle (see “Readings” section).

Réception des candidats
-
Pré-requis

There are no necessary pre-requisites. The following readings/viewings, however, should inspire some questions (provided in largely historical order):

Classics in the History of Psychology: Remarks on the Seat of the Faculty of Articulated Language, Following an Observation of Aphemia (Loss of Speech) by Mr. Paul Broca (1861)

Pinker, S. (1995).  Language acquisition.  In L. R. Gleitman & M. Liberman (Eds.), An Invitation to Cognitive Science:  Language. MIT Press. 

TedTalk - Susan Savage-Rumbaugh: The gentle genius of bonobos

Linguistics in Everyday Life

What nearly all languages have in common, whether you speak or sign? 

Gleitman, L. R. (2020). Sentence First, Arguments Afterward: Essays in Language and Learning. Oxford University Press.

Dernière modification : 28 juin 2022 10:07

Type d'UE
Enseignements fondamentaux de master
Disciplines
Linguistique, sémantique, Psychologie et sciences cognitives
Page web
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fC9ZHRjMqZZCoAzvA_7BhNoLmdCUpj7E6lU94AOQwz8/edit 
Langues
anglais
L’enseignement est uniquement dispensé dans cette langue.
Mots-clés
Apprentissage Développement Linguistique Psychologie
Aires culturelles
Amérique du Nord Europe France
Intervenant·e·s

1a. Course Description (English)

What are the features of the human brain allowing for the existence and re-creation of language? How does the environment contribute to its development? Once language networks have stabilized, how do they shape their perception and production of a variety of stimuli? We draw insights from current and classical research in many disciplines (e.g., linguistic theory & laboratory linguistics, experimental & developmental psychology, neuropsychology, neuroimaging, computer modeling) to shed light on a few key psycholinguistic issues ranging from phonology to semantics. 

1b. Course Description (French)

Quelles sont les caractéristiques du cerveau humain permettant l'existence et la re-création du langage? Comment l'environnement contribue-t-il à son développement? Une fois les réseaux linguistiques stabilisés, comment façonnent-ils leur perception et leur production d'une variété de stimuli? Nous nous inspirons des recherches classiques et actuelles dans de nombreuses disciplines (par exemple, théorie linguistique et linguistique expérimentale, psychologie expérimentale et développementale, neuropsychologie, neuroimagerie, modélisation informatique) pour éclairer quelques problèmes clés en psycholinguistique qui vont de la phonologie à la sémantique.

2. Learning outcomes

This course is conceived to help students:

  • Learn some basic vocabulary and concepts necessary to describe human language (e.g., phonology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics)

  • Understand the consequences of variation in those definitions

  • Read and critically evaluate scientific literature on language acquisition and processing

  • Reflect on the role of experience for the emergence of language skills in the individual, and of language features in a given language system (e.g., English, French, Nicaraguan Sign Language, etc.)

3a. Pedagogy, class organization and homework

The course will involve classroom activities, online forum discussions, and readings. There will be two hours of fixed meetings per week (“classes”). Each class will contain a mixture of lectures with in-class activities, partially based on that week’s forum discussions, which on their stead depend on that week’s readings. Please note that we have 3 hours booked together on Mondays. We strongly encourage students to use the third hour to work on their homework.

Classes will take place in the second semester of 2022-2023 (Between January and May).

Course contents 

Class 1 : Alex de Carvalho (Université de Paris) : Introduction: course structure; main features of language; main theories about language development; sub-fields
No readings

Class 2 : Valentin Thouzeau  (Ecole normale supérieure) — Language evolution and the evolution of language
Comparison with other species, evolution of humans and why and when language appeared, pidgin and creole, emergent sign languages, language change, experimental studies of language evolution
Readings: Kirby (2001), Christiansen, Chater, & Reali (2009)

Class 3 : Sharon PEPERKAMP (Ecole normale supérieure) - Language-specific speech perception
Readings: Pallier, Colomé, & Sebastián-Gallés (2001); Skoruppa et al., (2009)

Class 4 : Maria Giavazzi  (Ecole normale supérieure) -  Using linguistic theory to understand language impairment: the example of phonological deficits
Readings: Buchwald (2014), Buchwald, et al., (2007).

Class 5 : Maureen de Seyssel (Ecole normale Supérieure) — Word Learning: linguistic, perceptual & memory constraints on word learning across development
Readings: Brent (2001), Wittgenstein (2010)

Class 6 M: aureen de Seyssel  (Ecole normale supérieure) — March 14th

Understanding and producing words (adults): Classic models and bilingualism.
Readings: Costa et al. (2000), Rugg (1990)

Class 7 : Alex de Carvalho (Université de Paris) — Acquisition of syntax
Readings: de Carvalho et al., (2019), Gutman et al., (2015)

Class 8 : Maureen de Seyssel  (Ecole normale supérieure) — Second language acquisition
Reading: Díaz et al. (2016), Sanders et al. (2002)

Class 9 : Alejandrina CRISTIA (Ecole normale supérieure) —  Interactions across linguistic levels and beyond; bottom-up, top-down, and mixed models of language.
Readings: Heinz, J., & Idsardi, W. (2011); Ramus, F., et al., (2013). 

Class 10 : Alex de Carvalho (Université de Paris) - The relationship between oral language acquisition and reading readiness and academic success
Readings: Hassinger-Das et al., (2017); Golinkoff et al., (2019).

Class 11 Sho Tsuji & Alejandrina Cristia (Ecole normale supérieure) — Language in a social context: Conversation analysis, linguistic and cultural sampling biases.
Readings: Tsuji, Cristia & Dupoux (2021)

Class 12 Irene Altarelli (Université de Paris) — Reading and writing - in the brain, different writing systems and their effect on cognitive and linguistic processing and development
Readings: Dehaene et al., (2015)

  • Séminaires de tronc commun – Sciences cognitives – M1/S2-M2/S4
    Suivi et validation – semestriel hebdomadaire = 6 ECTS
    MCC – contrôle continu, fiche de lecture
Contacts additionnels
cogmaster@psl.eu
Informations pratiques

Classes will take place in person @ENS (29, rue d'Ulm) Salle T. Ribot

Responsable UE: Alex de Carvalho

E-mail: alex.de-carvalho@u-paris.fr

Office: 6th floor at the Laboratoire de Psychologie du Développement et de l'Éducation de l’Enfant - LaPsyDÉ, La Sorbonne - Université de Paris/CNRS

46 rue des Saint-Jacques, 75005 Paris

 

TA: Maureen de Seyssel

E-mail: maureen.deseyssel@gmail.com

Office: Centre des Sciences des Données (CSD), 45 rue d’Ulm, 75005 Paris 

Direction de travaux des étudiants

Assessments - Course Requirements and Grading

You will be evaluated in three ways.

  1. Online Forum 

a1) Participation (35% of the final grade). Each week, you should post one or more helpful and/or thought-generating comment, question, or answer bearing on the reading for that week on the online forum corresponding to that week on our Moodle webpage (section “Class Participation - Readings Forum”). Your participation can be a clarification question/answer (if there is something you did not understand, or you are answering someone who asked a clarification question); or it can bear on one of the areas that will be used to evaluate your article commentary (see item B below: research question, lit review, key term, methodology, claim, conclusions). Please use tags to indicate which it is. Your text should be maximally 250 words long - any extra words will not be read. It should be submitted by 23:59 on the Friday before the class. Grading only takes into account the first comment posted by you, but you are welcome to make more than one comment. There is a maximum of 2 points per class awarded (0=no participation or off-topic ; 1=satisfactory participation ; 2= good comment) for all classes except the very first one, and the one for which you are moderator (see next item).

a2) Moderation (10% of the final grade). For one class out of the 11 that have a forum, you will be in charge of systematizing the forum participation. Read comments and identify salient themes and/or questions that should be brought up in class, then post this as the final intervention in the corresponding forum section (“Moderation Comments” on Moodle). You must do this between Saturday at 00:00 and Sunday 23:59, so that the instructor has time to read your summary on Monday morning. When you are the moderator, you do not need to post a regular comment. If you are two moderators on the same week, post only one shared comment. The schedule of moderations for the entire semester will be fixed at the beginning of the semester (week of Feb 1st). It is now available here (link also accessible from Moodle).

B) Article commentary (50% of the grade). Imagine that you are a referee engaged in a peer-reviewed process for a generalist scientific journal. As a reviewer, your task is to evaluate an article following the 8 guiding criteria below. All criteria should be mentioned in your commentary. Each should be addressed by stating to what extent the manuscript meets it, and if not, what modifications or additions would be desirable. The text should be maximally 2000 words long (excluding bibliography, if any is cited), written in English or French. It is mandatory to write an approximate word count on the first page, and include a bibliography (using APA6 standards) on a separate page. 

You and the instructors will select one article (from this list) based on your expertise and interests.

Guidelines for article commentary:

  1. Research question: Has a research question been posed explicitly? (Yes or no.) If so, what is it according to the authors? If not, what do you think the research question should be, given the contents of the paper? Please bear in mind that a question is not the same as a theory or a hypothesis.

  2. Lit review: Is the literature review representative of diverse theoretical approaches to the research question? (Yes or no.) If yes, how? If not, what is it missing? 

  3. Key term (paper): Provide at least one example of a key concept or theoretical approach that has been defined and one that has not been defined. If you cannot find an example because they have all been defined or not defined, argument this clearly.

  4. Key term (class): Think back to the key linguistic and/or cognitive terms discussed in class; which one would be most relevant to this paper? Have the authors defined it? If not, what is the definition underlying their work? In either case, give a rationale of how a different definition would change their approach. 

  5. Methodology: Describe the methodology used. In what ways is this methodology, in principle, an appropriate or inappropriate methodology to answer the main research question?

  6. Claim: Give one example of a claim made by the authors. A claim is a statement for which there is no objective basis, and can be thus as opposed to a conclusion, which is defined as a statement  that is directly supported by the data/arguments. Do the authors present that claim as such (or do they confuse claims and conclusions)? 

  7. Conclusions: Bearing in mind the research question stated in #1, summarize briefly the conclusions drawn by the authors. In what ways do the data and/or the arguments conceptually support or not these conclusions? 

  8. Other comments: Draw on your own strengths to add something special to your review! Some examples are:

a) Commenting on the soundness of the experiments, statistics, and other analyses (including conceptual arguments).

b) OR: Providing a convincing argument whereby changing a key parameter of the methodology could lead to results opposite to those found.

c) OR: Name something missing from the literature review and explain how adding this piece of information would have affected the paper.

d) OR: anything else!

Choose one comment and develop it. In the case of multiple comments, only the first one will be graded.

C) In class participation (5% of the grade). Your in-class participation helps us evaluate your overall engagement with the course. There are many ways to participate even when the class is virtual, either by directly asking questions or using the online chat/forum. Your participation can be in English or in French. There is a maximum of 1 point per class awarded (0=no participation ; 1= participated).

3c. Textbook and readings

We will read primary scientific literature. See bibliography at the end, and course schedule below. It is mandatory to read all of the week's readings. The readings are all available on Moodle (see “Readings” section).

Réception des candidats
-
Pré-requis

There are no necessary pre-requisites. The following readings/viewings, however, should inspire some questions (provided in largely historical order):

Classics in the History of Psychology: Remarks on the Seat of the Faculty of Articulated Language, Following an Observation of Aphemia (Loss of Speech) by Mr. Paul Broca (1861)

Pinker, S. (1995).  Language acquisition.  In L. R. Gleitman & M. Liberman (Eds.), An Invitation to Cognitive Science:  Language. MIT Press. 

TedTalk - Susan Savage-Rumbaugh: The gentle genius of bonobos

Linguistics in Everyday Life

What nearly all languages have in common, whether you speak or sign? 

Gleitman, L. R. (2020). Sentence First, Arguments Afterward: Essays in Language and Learning. Oxford University Press.

  • Institut Jean-Nicod
    Salle Ribot
    29 rue d'Ulm 75005 Paris
    2nd semestre / hebdomadaire, lundi 14:00-17:00
    du 30 janvier 2023 au 15 mai 2023
    Nombre de séances : 12