UE443 - Phonology 2 [LING 301]


Lieu et planning


  • ENS-Ulm
    45 rue d'Ulm 75005 Paris
    1er semestre / hebdomadaire, vendredi 09:30-12:30
    du 18 septembre 2021 au 14 janvier 2022


Description


Dernière modification : 18 juin 2021 14:47

Type d'UE
Enseignements fondamentaux de master
Domaine
-
Disciplines
Psychologie et sciences cognitives
Page web
https://drive.google.com/file/d/15UvxnF1WCSKlE3tmWTzvaczwkGpHxs4D/view 
Langues
anglais
Mots-clés
Linguistique Sciences cognitives
Aires culturelles
-
Intervenant·e·s

This is an advanced course aimed at exposing students to a selection of key phonological phenomena, mainstream phonological theories and questions that are at the interface between phonology and other disciplines within linguistics and the cognitive sciences in general. The main goal is for students to learn to interpret and reflect on phonological arguments. The course is structured on the basis of modules, each taking about 3 classes. Each module is centred on a phonological phenomenon or question. A list of topics will be proposed to students during the first class but the final syllabus will be adapted to take into account the students’ interest (see §4 for an example). Each research question is investigated in the light of two or more theoretical approaches and/or experimental work. We will visit several topics such as, for example, the units of representation and basic operations, the interaction between phonology and phonetics, long-distance phonological processes and the neural basis of phonological processing.

On successful completion of this course, students should students
● will have gained conceptual knowledge on the topics discussed in class (see 4).
They should also be able to:
● understand and apply criteria to evaluate and compare competing theoretical explanations
● acquire other key skills as linguists, including being able to read and understand linguistic
● papers on diverse topics, and providing constructive comments to others
● reflect on how phonology can be thought in the context of a complete linguistic system, specifically, and the human mind and brain, more in general, formulate questions/comments linking competing theoretical explanations and different research perspective
● moderate and lead a scientific discussion around a set of questions/comments


Master


  • Séminaires de tronc commun – Sciences cognitives – M1/S1-M2/S3
    Suivi et validation – semestriel hebdomadaire = 6 ECTS
    MCC – CC + Projet + Présentation

Renseignements


Contacts additionnels
-
Informations pratiques
-
Direction de travaux des étudiants

Participation: This is an advanced reading-based class in which students’ participation both in class and on the Schoology blog is absolutely essential. Participating means being involved in the debate by asking challenging questions, but also not shying away from asking clarification questions on readings or on background knowledge. The entire class will benefit from these questions, especially given the wide variety of backgrounds of the students. Participating also means finding links between the topic under discussion and other topics discussed in class, or other research questions/methodologies that the student is independently interested in. A blog will be created for each one of the classes, where students will have to post questions on readings and class contents and/or answer the questions of other students on topics relevant to that class or the preceding class. Students must enter at least one submission for each class.
● Moderating discussion in class: Every week, 2 students will moderate the discussion around a given topic. Depending on the size of the class each student will moderate ca. twice during the semester, with a different teammate. Moderation will require gathering students’ comments and questions, organizing them to form a structured basis for discussion, and prepare a handout containing the different comments as well as illustrating the main points of the paper(s) under discussion.
● Project: The project must be in the format of a brief essay, defining a clear question, and then synthesizing and discussing a small selection of articles/chapters/books/etc. (typically between 3 and 5), related to one of the topics discussed during the semester.
Alternatively, it can contain an in-depth discussion of one article, bearing on a theoretical question discussed in class. The project need not present novel theoretical or empirical contributions but it must demonstrate a sound conceptual discussion of a topic relevant to the goals of this class. The essay must be 4,500-5,500 words long (without counting references).
● Feedback on someone else’s project: Students are randomly assigned someone else’s project for review in a single-blind fashion (i.e., the student knows who the author is but the author will not know who the reviewer is). They return feedback by submitting it as an assignment.
● Project presentation: Students will present their project on the last week of classes (15’ presentation + 15’ questions).
● Extra credit item (for up to 5% extra credit): Students can choose to turn in up to two 1- page talk reports. Talks bearing on topics covered by this class will be announced through the Schoology website throughout the semester.

Réception des candidats
-
Pré-requis

Phology I or permission of the teacher

Dernière modification : 18 juin 2021 14:47

Type d'UE
Enseignements fondamentaux de master
Domaine
-
Disciplines
Psychologie et sciences cognitives
Page web
https://drive.google.com/file/d/15UvxnF1WCSKlE3tmWTzvaczwkGpHxs4D/view 
Langues
anglais
Mots-clés
Linguistique Sciences cognitives
Aires culturelles
-
Intervenant·e·s

This is an advanced course aimed at exposing students to a selection of key phonological phenomena, mainstream phonological theories and questions that are at the interface between phonology and other disciplines within linguistics and the cognitive sciences in general. The main goal is for students to learn to interpret and reflect on phonological arguments. The course is structured on the basis of modules, each taking about 3 classes. Each module is centred on a phonological phenomenon or question. A list of topics will be proposed to students during the first class but the final syllabus will be adapted to take into account the students’ interest (see §4 for an example). Each research question is investigated in the light of two or more theoretical approaches and/or experimental work. We will visit several topics such as, for example, the units of representation and basic operations, the interaction between phonology and phonetics, long-distance phonological processes and the neural basis of phonological processing.

On successful completion of this course, students should students
● will have gained conceptual knowledge on the topics discussed in class (see 4).
They should also be able to:
● understand and apply criteria to evaluate and compare competing theoretical explanations
● acquire other key skills as linguists, including being able to read and understand linguistic
● papers on diverse topics, and providing constructive comments to others
● reflect on how phonology can be thought in the context of a complete linguistic system, specifically, and the human mind and brain, more in general, formulate questions/comments linking competing theoretical explanations and different research perspective
● moderate and lead a scientific discussion around a set of questions/comments

  • Séminaires de tronc commun – Sciences cognitives – M1/S1-M2/S3
    Suivi et validation – semestriel hebdomadaire = 6 ECTS
    MCC – CC + Projet + Présentation
Contacts additionnels
-
Informations pratiques
-
Direction de travaux des étudiants

Participation: This is an advanced reading-based class in which students’ participation both in class and on the Schoology blog is absolutely essential. Participating means being involved in the debate by asking challenging questions, but also not shying away from asking clarification questions on readings or on background knowledge. The entire class will benefit from these questions, especially given the wide variety of backgrounds of the students. Participating also means finding links between the topic under discussion and other topics discussed in class, or other research questions/methodologies that the student is independently interested in. A blog will be created for each one of the classes, where students will have to post questions on readings and class contents and/or answer the questions of other students on topics relevant to that class or the preceding class. Students must enter at least one submission for each class.
● Moderating discussion in class: Every week, 2 students will moderate the discussion around a given topic. Depending on the size of the class each student will moderate ca. twice during the semester, with a different teammate. Moderation will require gathering students’ comments and questions, organizing them to form a structured basis for discussion, and prepare a handout containing the different comments as well as illustrating the main points of the paper(s) under discussion.
● Project: The project must be in the format of a brief essay, defining a clear question, and then synthesizing and discussing a small selection of articles/chapters/books/etc. (typically between 3 and 5), related to one of the topics discussed during the semester.
Alternatively, it can contain an in-depth discussion of one article, bearing on a theoretical question discussed in class. The project need not present novel theoretical or empirical contributions but it must demonstrate a sound conceptual discussion of a topic relevant to the goals of this class. The essay must be 4,500-5,500 words long (without counting references).
● Feedback on someone else’s project: Students are randomly assigned someone else’s project for review in a single-blind fashion (i.e., the student knows who the author is but the author will not know who the reviewer is). They return feedback by submitting it as an assignment.
● Project presentation: Students will present their project on the last week of classes (15’ presentation + 15’ questions).
● Extra credit item (for up to 5% extra credit): Students can choose to turn in up to two 1- page talk reports. Talks bearing on topics covered by this class will be announced through the Schoology website throughout the semester.

Réception des candidats
-
Pré-requis

Phology I or permission of the teacher

  • ENS-Ulm
    45 rue d'Ulm 75005 Paris
    1er semestre / hebdomadaire, vendredi 09:30-12:30
    du 18 septembre 2021 au 14 janvier 2022